5 untranslatable expressions of joy

5 untranslatable expressions of joy

Denmark: 'Arbejdsglæde'

The Danish word "arbejdsglæde" describes the joy that Danes feel about their work. The term not only exists in Danish, but also in Swedish and Norwegian. In Nordic countries, obviously, being personally happy with your job is considered more important than a fat salary or a brilliant career.

5 untranslatable expressions of joy

Ireland: 'Suaimhneas croi'

The Irish have their own word for happiness — not about their work, but rather about the moment when a long working day finally comes to an end. That feeling of deep satisfaction that overwhelms a person once they've completed an important task is expressed by the Gaelic term "suaimhneas croi," that has something to do with peace and heart. It's certainly seems hard to pronounce.

5 untranslatable expressions of joy

Spain: 'Sobremesa'

If you want to stay on a Spaniard's good side, you should never wrap up a meal right after the food is done. In Spain, people appreciate their "sobremesa," which means spending a lot of time drinking coffee or a schnapps after the meal. This activity may even take longer than the dinner itself.

5 untranslatable expressions of joy

Sweden: 'Gökotta'

Getting up early in the morning to listen to the birds — that's what Swedes call "gökotta." The term consists of "gök," which means cuckoo, and "otta" which means earliness. According to the Swedes, this activity will bring you a deep feeling of happiness and joy for the rest of the day.

5 untranslatable expressions of joy

Norway: 'Utepils'

As soon as the days start to get longer and people enjoy the first rays of sunshine after a long winter, a striking phenomenon can be observed in Norway. People of all (legal drinking) ages come out to enjoy the weather and have an "utepils", or "outdoor lager," a beer that's consumed outside. For Norwegians, it's a very special moment of joy.

What makes people happy? That differs from country to country, and from language to language.