Germany's 16 states: Saxony

Culture meets nature in Saxony: a mere 40 kilometers lie between splendid Baroque art and architecture in Dresden and the distinctive peaks of the Elbe Sandstone Mountains.

10 reasons to love Saxony

Meissen porcelain

The Saxon city of Meissen is known the world over for its porcelain. The first European hard-paste porcelain was developed here in 1708. Even on journeys the kings of Saxony did not renounce the white gold, as this travel service from 1728 proves. Meissen porcelain remains one of Germany's best known products worldwide.

10 reasons to love Saxony

Muskau Park

The only UNESCO World Heritage site in Saxony is Muskau Park. In 1815, Prince Hermann von Pückler-Muskau began creating this masterpiece of garden design. The park extends on both sides of the river Neisse, which constitutes the border between Germany and Poland. The park offers broad meadows, miles of winding paths, numerous lakes, rivers, bridges and buildings, including the central New Castle.

10 reasons to love Saxony

Dresden

Culture, art and churches - Saxony's state capital Dresden is a Mecca for tourists. The Frauenkirche church pictured here was destroyed at the end of the Second World War and remained a ruin for decades. After German unification it was rebuilt using as much original material as possible. When it reopened in 2005, Dresden won back one of its famous landmarks.

10 reasons to love Saxony

Elbe meadows

The opposite shore of the river Elbe offers a fabulous view of Dresden's historical Baroque center. The predominantly undeveloped meadows that stretch along the river for some 30 kilometers (18 miles) are a good location for walking and, particularly in the summer, for picnics. For art lovers there are open air film nights and concerts.

10 reasons to love Saxony

Saxon Switzerland

Right near the Elbe river valley, a national park called Saxon Switzerland is just the right place for those wanting to hike or climb. The hilly climbing area of the Elbe Sandstone Mountains is known for its bizarre rock formations that can reach a height of 730 meters (2,395 ft).

10 reasons to love Saxony

Cheaper than Berlin

Leipzig celebrated recently its millennial anniversary. But the city is by no means old-fashioned. It's popular among younger people who regard it as the "better and less expensive Berlin." In the western part of the city for instance many artists have established studios in abandoned cotton mills. This vibrancy and creativity in Leipzig is also reflected in its numerous bars and galleries.

10 reasons to love Saxony

Leipzig

Founded as a trade city, Leipzig is today closely associated with Johann Sebastian Bach. Even though the famous composer was not born here, Leipzig is the place he spent most of his working life. This is reflected in the Bach archive, the Bach Museum and honored annually with the Bach Festival. He is buried in St Thomas' Church where was choir leader of the renowned Thomanerchor from 1723 to 1750.

10 reasons to love Saxony

The Ore Mountains

Depending on the season, you can hike or ski here while spending time in two different countries. The German-Czech Republic border runs through the Ore Mountain range. On the German side, on the Fichtelberg mountain is Oberwiesenthal: With an altitude of 914 meters (almost 3,000 ft), it is Germany's highest town. From there, a cable car takes visitors up to the top of the mountain.

10 reasons to love Saxony

Görlitz

Germany's easternmost city survived the Second World War virtually undamaged. As a result, the town boasts 4,000 historical buildings from different eras. That in turn attracts international moviemakers: Görlitz has been used as a film location for several Hollywood blockbusters, such as "The Grand Budapest Hotel" - earning it the local nickname of Görliwood.

10 reasons to love Saxony

Sorbs

Lower Lusatia in Brandenburg and Upper Lusatia in Saxony are settlement areas of the West Slavic Sorbs, who are a recognized German national minority. Sorbs are also known for their traditional costumes, which these days tend only to be worn for celebrations, like here at the "Zapust" festival, which features traditional dress, parades and dancing.

Saxony is steeped in history with a fabulous treasure trove in Dresden, a busy trade fair and trading centre in Leipzig and an insider tip for architecture fans in Löbau. A total of four million people live in this diverse federal state in eastern Germany.

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01:25 mins.
Travel | 02.05.2019

Travel tips Saxony

Leipzig

Young, dynamic, creative - Leipzig is Saxony's largest city and an aspiring metropolis. The Peaceful Revolution began here in 1989, which brought down and ended the former East Germany. Lukas Stege, host of the TV Travel Magazine Check-in, takes an excursion into the city's past and present.

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10:44 mins.
Travel | 22.03.2019

Leipzig: City of the Peaceful Revolution

Dresden

The historical and political heart of Saxony beats in the state capital. It owes its nickname, "Florence on the Elbe," to the splendid Baroque buildings in the city center and the vineyards along the River Elbe on its outskirts.

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02:04 mins.
Travel | 08.04.2018

City portrait: Dresden

Elbe Sandstone Mountains

Climbers find exactly 1125 peaks in the Elbe Sandstone Mountains, also known as Saxon Switzerland. This special landscape got its name in the 18th century from Swiss people who felt reminded of their homeland.

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02:04 mins.
Check-in | 14.04.2018

A trip to the Elbe Sandstone Mountains

House Schminke in Löbau

A jewel of modern architecture can be found in the small Saxon town of Löbau near Görlitz: Haus Schminke, named after its builder Fritz Schminke. Hans Scharoun designed the family villa in the unusual shape of a ship. Today it is a museum where visitors can even spend the night.

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01:02 mins.
Travel | 07.05.2019

#DailyDrone: Schminke House, Löbau

A highlight in a 360 degree video

The Saxon king Augustus the Strong had his royal capital rebuilt as a Baroque artwork – from the Zwinger palace complex to the Taschenbergpalais, to the Frauenkirche, the Church of Our Lady, Dresden's symbol of tolerance and peace. 

Use the mouse on your computer or your finger on your smartphone to choose what you want to see. Click on the video and drag the image sections wherever you want. If you are using a PC, use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox as a browser. And if you have VR glasses, you can watch the video in virtual reality.

Your trip to Germany

Are you looking for recommendations for your visit to Germany? We've got them: Tips for Germany - state by state.