Hungary's Viktor Orban calls for right-wing union in Europe

During a speech to ethnic Hungarians in Romania, Orban called for the advent of "Christian democracy." He defined this ideology as "anti-immigrant" and "anti-multicultural."

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban decried the "undemocratic" governments of Western Europe on Saturday, as he laid out his vision for the continent ahead of European elections next year. He also called on right-wing parties across the European Union to band together.

"There is liberalism in the West, there is no democracy," said Orban in a speech to ethnic Hungarians in Baile Tusnad, Romania.

Orban then called the European Commission a "symbol of failure."

"The European Commission is going, we are coming," he said.

The Commission has referred Orban's government to the European Court of Justice (ECJ) for controversial laws punishing those giving aid to migrants, as well as over allegations of unfair treatment of refugees in Hungarian transit centers.

Orban: Europe must be defended from immigration

He called on a new model for Europe based on "Christian democracy," which he said is "anti-immigrant, anti-multicultural and stands for the Christian family model."

"Europe's leaders are inadequate, they are unable to defend Europe from immigration."

Orban also called the EU's attitude towards Russia "primitive," and called for an end to sanctions against Moscow.

Viktor Orban's most controversial migration comments

'Muslim invaders'

"We don't see these people as Muslim refugees. We see them as Muslim invaders," Orban said in a recent interview with German daily Bild newspaper. The 54-year-old prime minister of Hungary added: "We believe that a large number of Muslims inevitably leads to parallel societies, because Christian and Muslim society will never unite." Multiculturalism, he said, "is only an illusion."

Viktor Orban's most controversial migration comments

'You wanted the migrants, we didn't'

When asked by Bild whether it was fair for Germany to accept hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants while Hungary accepted none, Orban responded: "The difference is, you wanted the migrants, and we didn't." Migration, he said, threatens the "sovereignty and cultural identity" of Hungary.

Viktor Orban's most controversial migration comments

'Migration is poison'

It was not the first time the Hungarian leader has framed migration as a problem for his country. In 2016, he said that Hungary "does not need a single migrant for the economy to work, or the population to sustain itself, or for the country to have a future." He added: "for us migration is not a solution but a problem ... not medicine but a poison, we don’t need it and won’t swallow it.”

Viktor Orban's most controversial migration comments

'Importing homophobia'

Orban has repeatedly criticized German Chancellor Angela Merkel for her decision to allow over a million migrants into Germany in the summer of 2015. Orban told Bild in early 2016: "If you take masses of non-registered immigrants from the Middle East into your country, you are importing terrorism, crime, anti-Semitism, and homophobia."

Viktor Orban's most controversial migration comments

'All terrorists are basically migrants'

Orban has also repeatedly criticized the EU for trying to get member states to share refugees based on national quotas. In a 2015 interview with POLITICO, he suggested the bloc's leaders instead focus more on strengthening the EU's external border. In the same interview, he said: "Of course it’s not accepted, but the factual point is that all the terrorists are basically migrants."

Viktor Orban's most controversial migration comments

'Parallel societies'

Orban has found allies in other right-wing governments in eastern Europe such as Poland that also oppose the EU's refugee policies. In an interview with Spanish TV channel Intereconomia in 2015, Orban raised fears about integrating Muslim migrants in the EU when he said: "What sort of Europe do we want to have? Parallel societies? Muslim communities living together with the Christian community?"

es/aw (AFP, dpa)

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