Russia 2018: The venues

Sports

Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow

The main stadium, which is home to the Russian national team, has a capacity of 81,000. It will be the venue for both the opening match and the World Cup final, as well as one of the semifinals. The stadium, which has been renovated for the World Cup, has previously hosted a Champions League final and the Summer Olympic Games.

Sports

Saint Petersburg Stadium

The new home of Zenit St. Petersburg holds 68,000 spectators. It is the venue for one of the semifinals and the third-place match. It will also host a game in the last 16 as well as group stage matches, including one of Russia's clashes. Saint Petersburg Stadium was also a venue for the 2017 Confederations Cup.

Sports

Yekaterinburg Arena

The Yekateringburg Arena, which was built in 1953 has been refurbished for the 2018 World Cup. The stadium, with a capacity of 35,000, is the home of FC Ural of the Russian first division. Yekaterinburg is the furthest east of the host cities.

Sports

Rostov Arena

Rostov Arena, with a capacity of 45,000 is one of the new stadiums built specifically for the World Cup. The stadium will host four group-stage games and one match in the last 16. It will become the new home of FC Rostov after next summer's tournament.

Sports

Volgograd Arena

This venue was built on the site of the old Central Stadium in Volgograd near the Volga river. It can hold over 45,000 spectators and will only be used for the group stage. After the World Cup, it will become the home of Rotor Volgograd, a club currently playing in Russia's second division. Volgograd used to be known as Stalingrad.

Sports

Nizhny Novgorod Stadium

This 45,000 capacity stadium was built specifically for the World Cup. It will host four group-stage games as well as a round-of-16 match and a quarterfinal. After the tournament, it is expected to become the home ground of Olimpiyets Nizhny Novgorod of the Russian second division, although in March 2017, then-regional governor Valery Shantsev said it would also be used for other sporting events.

Sports

Kaliningrad Stadium

This is the only World Cup venue in an exclave of Russia — Kaliningrad is a territory between Poland and Lithuania. The 35,000-capacity stadium was built specifically for the World Cup and will be downsized after the tournament. It is only a venue for the group stage and will become the new home of Baltika Kaliningrad, a club in Russia's second division.

Sports

Mordovia Arena, Saransk

German architect Tim Hupe designed this brand new bowl stadium for the World Cup. The stadium has a capacity of 44,000 and will only host matches in the group stage. After the tournament, the upper seating will be dismantled and the stadium will be handed over to third-tier Russian side Mordovia Saransk.

Sports

Samara Arena

This 44,000 capacity stadium was built for the World Cup on an island south of Samara where no settlements or infrastructure previously existed. This is where hosts Russia will play their final group-stage match. A last-16 match and a quarterfinal will also be played in the stadium, which is to become the home of Krylya Sovetov, currently in the Russian second division, after the tournament.

Sports

Spartak Stadium, Moscow

Though it was used for the Confederations Cup, the Spartak Stadium, with a capacity of 45,000, will only be used for four group-stage games and one first knockout-stage game. The arena was re-opened in 2014 and is the home of Spartak Moscow, Russia's most successful football club.

Sports

Kazan Arena

A venue for the Confederations Cup, Kazan Arena will be used for a last 16 game, a quarterfinal and four group stage games. The capacity of the stadium is 41,585. Vladimir Putin laid the cornerstone for the stadium before it opened in 2013. It is the home ground of Rubin Kazan.

Sports

Fisht Stadium, Sochi

This 41,220-capacity stadium was constructed for the 2014 Winter Olympic Games. A large section of the roof has been removed to accommodate football. A last 16 match and a quarterfinal will be played here as well as four group games.

The draw for the 2018 World Cup in Russia takes place on Friday. Here is a look at the 12 stadiums that will host matches at next June and July's tournament.

     

More in the Media Center