Tokyo 'virtual reality' restaurant combines cusine with fine art

Tokyo 'virtual reality' restaurant combines cusine with fine art

A new way to experience dining

The "Tree by Naked" restaurant was launched in July 2017. Located not far from Yoyogi Park in Tokyo, the restaurant combines culinary, artistic, and virtual reality (VR) elements. The restaurant offers Japanese and Western fusion cuisine and diners feel the sensation of a combination of projection mapping, lighting, music and other artistic features.

Tokyo 'virtual reality' restaurant combines cusine with fine art

An artistic vision

The restaurant was created by Ryotaro Muramatsu, director of Naked Inc. The company is known for its intricate and creative digital imagery. "Naked" in the restaurant's name comes from Muramatsu's company, so you can leave your clothes on.

Tokyo 'virtual reality' restaurant combines cusine with fine art

A moveable feast

The restaurant serves only dinner and takes bookings for two time slots each evening with up to eight guests. Housed in a three-story building, diners are guided from one floor to another while being served different courses. For example, the main course is served on the first floor and dessert is served on the second floor.

Tokyo 'virtual reality' restaurant combines cusine with fine art

Not a cheap place to eat

Images are projected onto the food, creating a combined visual presentation with the projection cast onto the plate. And the experience comes at a premium. A six-course meal is 15,000 yen ($135, €118) per person. It includes two appetizers, a fish course, a meat course, dessert - and a mystery course.

Tokyo 'virtual reality' restaurant combines cusine with fine art

Dessert time!

Dessert is an original treat created by Parisian chocolatier Hugo & Victor. Guests enjoy this dessert in the “Forest Laboratory,” where a fully grown tree transforms through the four seasons. Light and smoke effects also add to the ambiance.

Tokyo 'virtual reality' restaurant combines cusine with fine art

Activate all of the senses

Sight, taste, smell, touch and sound - with his concept, artist Muramatsu wants to appeal to all of the senses. The projections are partly interactive and react to the behavior of the visitors. For example, if there is an image of fish on the table, you can tap it and it seems to swim away. (With Reuters/Nikkei Asian Review/Der Spiegel)

Digital innovation is opening doors to new dining concepts, and in Tokyo, a virtual reality restaurant has become one of the city's most unique places to eat.